SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : April 2020

 

In this Issue

Pro-Profile - One with the Monks
On The Horizon - Rarindra Prakarsa
Unexplored Places in India
Tips for the Non-Traveling Photographer
How To Tell Your Stories Through Your Photograph
 
 
 
 
 

Pro-Profile - One with the Monks

From running away from home at the age of 16 to having his peculiar styles in portraits, Jimmy Nelson epitomises everything that you expect from a travel photographer. Humble, hardworking and overall an affable guy, his photographs communicate the subject’s sense of being. In an interview with Asian Photography he speaks about his process and how patience always pays off.


How did you get into photography?

My journey with photography started in my childhood as my father was a geologist and spend his time away from us. I was a young child and I remember these communities and different parts of the world. I was taken out of this side of the world and put in boarding school, so I was confused between both the worlds.

But becoming a photographer was an accident. At the age of 16, I ran away to Tibet and stayed with the monks. With a small camera, I was trying to find a way to reconnect with myself and the experience that I had in my childhood. And in many ways, I’ve spent the whole of my life since then trying to reconnect with it. It’s not the photography which thrills me, but it’s using the camera to see the others and present them in a way that we’ve never normally seen them.


How did you develop an interest in photographing portraits of tribal and indigenous

people?

Well, I just described in my previous answer the interest started when I left home and went to Tibet to stay with the monks. And trying to find a way to reconnect with myself and that experience I had in my childhood. I used to capture photos of everyone who was nice to me. And that's how I developed my interest in photographing tribal and indigenous people.


What is the most difficult and rewarding part of being a photographer for you?

Today everyone is a photographer with the growing technology and people capturing images with their smartphones and basic cameras. Everyone captures their own vision. For me this a challenge as well as good to see people evolving with the technology. I am happy that I capture something different and unique from the rest, but I don't know how far it will go looking at the rise in technology. So the rewarding part is of course the work I do to make myself happy and the difficult part is that there is competition.


 
 
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On The Horizon - Rarindra Prakarsa

From being a graphic artist to becoming a full-time photographer, Rarindra Prakarsa has had a journey that transcends from analogue to the digital era in photography. He speaks to Asian Photography about how this journey happened and also how pictures influence and inspire his work and not photographers.



How did you get into photography and what was the reason to choose this genre?

I started photography when I was in college and took up graphic arts. One of the subjects in that was Photography. During that time it was the analogue era in mid 90’s. I didn’t have camera at that time and would borrow it from my lecturer and friend. These were completely manual cameras and I wasn’t sure what I liked. But I really liked two subjects: Photography and Graphic Arts.

At that time, I liked street photography a lot and also journalism since I worked in a newspaper as graphic designer. Some photojournalists in my office influenced me on how interesting it was being in field taking picture for news. But later I realised that I couldn’t be a photojournalist, since I wanted my pictures to be seen by many people, since I love taking pictures of people and their environment. I converted my equipment to digital cameras 2004 and started developing my style. Internet was really helpful to promote my work and get the response for the style I was developing.


Your photographs have a cinematic and drawing feel to them. How do you manage to achieve this?

There are two moments that have influenced my work and my style. First was the movie ‘Last Emperor’ which featured beautiful light and cinematic art, and the second was after attending the painting exhibition of Water Spies, which influenced me on how he created the depth,

composition, light and colours.

I was trying to apply what I have seen from those arts. I was thinking that the key to achieve that taste is lighting. Of course, I am confidently speaking about this after mastering composition and all the basic photography. Next on my list is perfecting all the pictures with post-processing, making them more dramatic and colour matching.

 
 
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Unexplored Places in India

India is a country with many different cultures, traditions, languages and people. In every part of India, you will see different cultures, traditions and styles. But often we only end up covering the famous places and forget that there are many places still left unexplored. So in this article we have lets take a look at some of these unexplored and amazing places from different parts of India.


 
 
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Tips for the Non-Traveling Photographer

Where will you find this interesting stuff? You can look for some great articles in Asian Photography Magazine for Travel Photography that are based on some great locations or you can also join travel photography workshops of various photographers. Interesting stuff is not only restricted to a specific place, a good photographer can capture powerful photographs anywhere on the planet, with any camera. So if you don’t have the bandwidth to travel outside currently then think of your own city first. In this article we focus on some of the tips that help you look at your own city with a different light. Because your city is on someone else’s travel list.

 
 
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How To Tell Your Stories Through Your Photograph

Have you ever wondered how to create impact in your photographs? While most people still continue to focus on composition and lighting, it might be a good time to step away from those and think how can you pull viewers into the frame and make them think deeper. If you achieved this art of making people think looking at your pictures then it can create wonders in your photographs.

 
 
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