SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : March 2015

 

In this Issue

10 DSLR tweaks for better pictures
Column: Arko Datta
Using depth to your advantage
Pro Profile - Arun M. Nair
The Art of Travel Photography
Shoot my city: Into the Dooars
Creative Underexposure
 
 
 
 
 

10 DSLR tweaks for better pictures

When you pick up a new DSLR it takes a little while for you to get used to it. The functions, the dial the settings everything takes a little while for you to adapt. What if we tell you there are some easy minor tweaks that you can do in the DSLR that can make your life even easier? Ever wish you could customise your DSLR to make it work exactly the way you wanted? Or to make it better somehow—to make the operation faster, to boost the battery stamina, to match a specific shooting situation better, or even to make it a special-purpose camera? You can pretty much do everything with it; with adjustments ranging from simple, no-cost setting tweaks to physical modification of the camera, you can turn it the whole thing around.

 
 
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Column: Arko Datta

I feel privileged to live the life of a photojournalist. I not only get to witness history being made from the front seat, but record it, and in a sense influence it as well. 
The world of photojournalism has always been magical to me and I associate a sense of idealism with it. I never did it for the money. Yes, I did need to earn my bread but that was not my motivation to pick up the camera. And it cannot be, when you start as an eight-year-old! It was not about designations, salaries, recognition or awards. I was in it for the sheer joy of recording moments and capturing the world around me. And like many photojournalists, I grew up to loving the genre of street of photography that eventually lead to photojournalism.

 
 
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Using depth to your advantage

Whenever we talk about composing a shot the first thing that comes to our mind is Depth of Field (DOF). Sometimes you may also wonder why you should care if your pictures are in focus.  All of us talk a lot about Depth of Field in most of our articles. Based on the assumption that we all understand that in layman’s terms, ‘depth of field’ is the portion of an image that is in sharp focus to illustrate. For example, in landscape photography, generally you’re working to achieve a very large depth of field, and you want everything in the scene to be in sharp focus. On the other hand, with portraits, photographers are often shooting for a more shallow depth of field, focussing in on their subjects and working towards fall off or blur in the background. Why do you think this is the case? Clearly, to draw focus to the story being told. But what if you want to tell a different story or what if you want to tell the same story in a different way? In this article, we are going to just talk about field and some ways you can use foreground in a different way to draw a different kind of attention to the story you’re trying to tell. Here are three ways to create "story telling images” using foreground to achieve creative depth of field.

 
 
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Pro Profile - Arun M. Nair

Hailing from Kerala, this young photographer was once studying animation and drawing cars and bikes looking at automotive magazines as a hobby. However, the revving of the automobiles couldn’t keep him behind a desk anymore. His passion for automobiles, with a natural eye for photography, was combined and he was soon capturing those same zooming supercars and bikes with his lens for an automotive magazine. Having now worked with multiple magazines across Middle East, he is quickly becoming known for his work in the speed racing world. This month, we speak to Arun M. Nair, and find out how he shifts his camera gears to match the fast faced cars.

 
 
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The Art of Travel Photography

They say that a camera is essentially a device that captures a photograph, but this ideally is a technical phenomenon. ‘Photography’however is quite different from it. In fact, photography is a blend of technology and art. Like any other subject, it has a number of branches and ‘Travel Photography’ is one of them. There are number of things that one has to consider while shooting travel and some of these include where to shoot, when to shoot, why to shoot and even how to shoot? So an experience gathered in travel photography can be expressed, exchanged or even described in words yet there are some things that are not possible to express in words. Only then a photograph becomes a vivid document of a particular travel.

 
 
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Shoot my city: Into the Dooars

I have travelled several times across the Terai and Dooars and covered multiple places, from the tea gardens and large green forests to way up North in adjacent area of Himalayas to Alipurduar extreme south of this region. But whenever I go there, I stumble upon something new in this land and end up getting lost in its natural beauty.
This region is fondly known as the land of tribal, and it’s to the North of West Bengal, with the Eastern Himalayas as a natural backdrop. You will find a vast texture of dense forests teeming with wildlife, unending tea gardens, and babbling rivers, interspersed with sleepy or busy settlements, constitute a fascinating tourist destination.

 
 
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Creative Underexposure

Like we discussed creative uses of noise in images in the last issue, this time we are going to look at purposeful underexposure in photography. Underexposure is seen as a ‘Don’t’ in photography, just like excessive noise in pictures. It is seen as negative thing that one must try to avoid when clicking pictures, and attempt to get perfect exposure. But does correct exposure always do an image justice? Read on to find out.

 
 
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