SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : October 2014

 

In this Issue

Using coloured gels to create portraits
Photographing Beverages
From animation to photography
Guide to buying your first printer
The Highs and Lows
It’s in the details
NIKON D750 Review
 
 
 
 
 

Using coloured gels to create portraits

Over the last few months we at Asian Photography magazine have been bringing various tips and techniques on shooting and editing images in an array of genres. In the process of creating such content, we not only present unique articles to you but also learn something new ourselves. One such technique that keeps us wanting more is shooting in a studio environment, may it be shooting people or products; there’s always something new to learn. Even though we repeatedly end up shooting similar subjects or similar lighting setup, it helps us improve and fine tune certain aspects of the technique or imagery. But we have to agree, that it does get boring and you may feel like you’re shooting nothing new. This month we are revisiting the studio space with a much more experimental approach, where you can create images using various colour gels to create fun lighting ideas. We will run you through the basics of the setup we have used in this article. 

 
 
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Photographing Beverages

We wrote about food photography recently, and this month we're going to focus on shooting beverages.
Clicking pictures of drinks which are either cold or hot is slightly different than clicking food photos. For instance, natural light rarely works in favour unless you are shooting hot tea or coffee. Most of the time, you would be shooting in dim light inside bars or restaurants. So you need to be well versed with the technicalities of shooting in low light. Also, using external flash or supporting lights to light up the setting is important. This is to assist you in getting a nice shine on the glass in which the beverage is held. However, it’s best to avoid using the built-in flash as it will hit the glass directly and will not bring out the beverage’s grace.

 
 
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From animation to photography

After trying her hand at photography at an early age, she soon moved towards the world of computer graphics and 3D animation. She worked in the graphics and animation film industry for some time, which took her to further study creative media in Australia. During her stint, she gathered lighting techniques that she organically put to use to her early passion – photography. She has taught at a number of schools and workshops across the country, and is known for her intriguing portraits. This month, we talk to Bhavpreet Ghai to find out more about her photographic journey.

 
 
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Guide to buying your first printer

With the onset if digital technology to such a level where use of paper is becoming redundant, print still forms a part of our everyday life. Right from printing images for your child’s project to that last minute print you need before you head for a meeting, or even printing photos that you’ve previously clicked; printers have come a long way right from being a service provided by a vendor to an everyday household product. Over a period of time, we at Asian Photography magazine have presented various reviews and shootouts of both Photo printers and Multifunction printers. There are various types of printers - inkjets, monochrome lasers, and colour lasers and multifunction printers in the market, but choosing a right one for you from such a huge array may make it a perplex decision to make. No matter which kind of printer you're looking for, here's the information you need to make a well-informed purchase.

 
 
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The Highs and Lows

High key and low key images both play around a lot with contrast but both in their exceptionally different ways. While you are approached to shoot a dramatic portrait of a person, using the right key or just a regular image with heavy post is the question one should ask themselves and convey. A lot of photographers consider high key medium to be a sort of happy lighting method where everything is full of light and is white. On the other hand, low key images are dark and convey a lot of not-so vibrant vibes. Basically, a low key image is an image which revolves a lot around darks tones and shadows with colour, just like high key images, they convey an atmosphere or a mood to you but on a more dramatic and dark way which actually makes you feels like you are reading a mystery. On one hand where high key lighting lights the subjects to reduce the shadows and contrasts, low key on the other hand creates striking contrasts by reducing a little or lot light. When it comes to low key, shadows are the most important part of the composition. 

 
 
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It’s in the details

Hungarian photographer, Robert Capa once said, "If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.” Capa meant this in a physically as well as emotionally.  A photographer’s eyes are always on a lookout to capture and seize the moment. A good image is usually self-explanatory and often tells a visual story that describes the scenario without having to caption it. A visual story is a powerful way to give your viewers a taste of a situation. 

 
 
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NIKON D750 Review

Nikon launched its latest full-frame D750 on 12th September just a day before Photokina 2014 which makes the D750 the 5th EF camera to be launched this year by the manufacturer. The list includes Nikon Df, D610, D810 and D4S. With 24MP and EXPEED 4 processor, the D750 slots above the D610, as it carries the EXPEED 3 processor, but below the professionally-oriented D810. We tested the D750 with a 50mm 1.4, read on to find out how it performed.

 
 
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