SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : March 2014

 

In this Issue

Architectural Momento
Basics of shooting landscape images
THROUGH THE FRAMES
From Colour to Monochrome
The exquisite expanse - Pro Profile
FujiFilm X-E2 Review
Nikon D3300 Review
Ricoh Pentax K3 Review
Shoot My City – Bali
Symmetrical Photography – The Mirror Image Strategy
The RAW deal
 
 
 
 
 

Architectural Momento

In the last month’s issue we spoke about the basics of Street Photography, this month we bring to you some of the tips and techniques that can be helpful while shooting Architecture.

 

There are two major challenges that a photographer faces while shooting architecture – perfect lighting and image distortion.  Image distortion occurs when the building has lines running horizontally and vertically and they appear distorted. Distortion looks good sometimes, but not all the time. When it comes to lighting, when photographing the exteriors, natural light is all you have got, and you have to capture the subject at its most alluring settings; you have options of lighting the exterior up with artificial lights.

Interior architecture with repeating patterns and different shapes is a golden parachute to the falling photographers while struggling to get the perfect exposure. Use of different camera angles would unfold the beauty of these designs. 

 
 
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Basics of shooting landscape images

Quite often, we come across a beautiful landscape, and when we photograph it, little does it look like anything we had originally seen. When we look at a scene, our eyes can selectively focus on part(s) of it that appeal the most to us. Our eyes and brain travel over a scene before us and have the ability to ignore the distractions. This cannot be done even by the most sophisticated camera equipment. However, there are a few ways you can construct a good landscape photograph with minimal distractions.

 
 
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THROUGH THE FRAMES

Composition according to textbook definition is something that is created by arranging several things to form a unified whole. That is exactly what it is. The composition of your photograph is the combination of visual elements coming together to create the whole image. We often put the photos we take into frames as a way of displaying and drawing attention to our main subject – but there is another type of framing that you can do, as you’re taking your shots, which can be just as effective doing just the same thing. Framing is the technique of drawing attention to the subject of your image by blocking other parts of the image with something in the scene.

 
 
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From Colour to Monochrome

Albeit the digital age has brought us better colours and millions of megapixels, we continue to embrace the traditional medium. Choosing coloured images over monochrome, or vice-versa, has been debated back and forth. Photographing portraits, landscapes or even wildlife, can be moulded to suit anyone’s artistic style and have become more accessible, as digital photography offers a lot more creative freedom. A monochrome image is treated as a genre in itself and there are no real limits to the subjects you can shoot. The advantage is that we no longer have to select between shooting in colour or in monochrome, with the advent of the digital age of photography.

The darkroom has also been updated giving credit to image-editing software programmes like Adobe Photoshop which gives photographers a lot more control over the conversion process when it comes to adjusting light, contrast and tonal range. 

 
 
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The exquisite expanse - Pro Profile

After taking up photography 15 years ago professionally, he has carved out a niche for himself as a landscape, time-lapse photographer. He has extensively shot around the Southwest of North America, and produced stunning images and time-lapse videos in his Landscape series, that have taken the internet by storm. This month, we talk to US -based photographer Dustin Farrell about how he discovered photography, and his love for landscape and time-lapse.

 
 
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FujiFilm X-E2 Review

Since FujiFilm introduced their X- series in 2010, they have bombarded the imaging industry with some chic, retro-looking cameras with brilliant optics and image quality. One of their latest entrants in the compact system camera segment is the FujiFilm X-E2 which replaces the X-E1. Few of the improvements that the X-E2 has over its predecessor are the 16.3 megapixel APS-C sized X-Trans CMOS II sensor, a Lens Modulation Optimiser which automatically corrects diffraction blur, EXR Processor II, hybrid auto-focus system with fast AF speeds of 0.08 second, 7fps burst shooting, a built-in flash, Wi-Fi connectivity and Full HD video recording capabilities at up to 60fps.

 
 
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Nikon D3300 Review

Nikons latest entry, the D3300 is the company’s latest entry-level DSLR camera which replaces the Nikon D3200. The Nikon D3300 boasts of a 24.2 megapixel APS-C sensor along with the latest EXPEED 4 processor. It also features 5fps continuous shooting and Full HD video recording. The camera's ISO range tops out at 25,600 and optional wireless sharing to smartphones or tablets can be accomplished via Nikon's WU-1a module or an Eye-Fi SD card.

We put the D3300 to the test this month, and let’s take a look at how it turned out.

 
 
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Ricoh Pentax K3 Review

From lens-style to mirrorless full frame camera, in the past few months, we have had many firsts, when it comes to reviews. This month, we are reviewing a Pentax product for the first time ever. Pentax, now a part of Ricoh Imaging, launched K-3 last year has its flagship model for their K digital SLR camera series.  

The camera boasts of a weather resistant body with 92 protection seals. It has a 24 effective megapixel sensor APS-C size CMOS sensor, with a PRIME III imaging engine, and the world’s first anti-aliasing simulator. It features 8.3 fps continuous shooting, with full HD video recording.

The camera has won several accolades around the world, but we put it to test to see how it performed.

 
 
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Shoot My City – Bali

In this month Shoot my city, we take you to the exotic city of Bali. Generally referred to as one of the most popular vacation destinations in the world, Bali attracts all kinds of tourists – families, honeymooners, surfers, backpackers and many more. Our journey to Bali was the shortest SMC I’ve personally experienced; I guess a week would be apt enough to explore the place, but then again, I would have loved to stay there for a month. 

 
 
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Symmetrical Photography – The Mirror Image Strategy

Trying different techniques to compose creative frames can result in an interesting piece of art. In today’s digital world, photographers are not only trying out different angles and techniques, but are also adding different compositions. One such composition is engaging symmetry in images. Derived from the greek words ‘sun’, meaning ‘with’ and ‘metron’ defining ‘measure’, symmetry conveys the pleasant sense of proportionality and balance.

 
 
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The RAW deal

"I shoot in RAW” sounds like a fairly provocative statement to make, but it is one I say often, as it is a common question I am asked. Most people even if they are not much of a photography buff are familiar with what a JPEG file is or even perhaps a TIFF file. However, the RAW "file” remains somewhat of a mystery, at least to those new to photography, and in my experience, almost every client that ever hires you.

 

It is a bit of a misnomer to call a RAW file ‘a file’ in the same way as you refer to a JPEG or TIFF file. A RAW capture needs to be processed to be fully edited and ultimately printed or digitally displayed, whereas a JPEG or TIFF tagged image is processed and compressed and in some stage, used as an image file.  I say some stage, as there can be several layers to fully completing an image today, and several variations of the same basic image.

 
 
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