SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : October 2013

 

In this Issue

ALL-IN-ONE PRINTER SHOOTOUT
JUST Do It! - Ritam Banerjee
Jodhpur – Beyond the blue horizon
Pole Photography
Camera bags how to keep your equipment in one piece
Restoring old damaged photographs’
From Darkroom to Lightroom
LG Pocket Photo Printer
 
 
 
 
 

ALL-IN-ONE PRINTER SHOOTOUT

With the constant technological developments, the competition between gadgets is getting fiercer. And the printers are no exception. With increasing demands from consumers, manufacturers are pushing the edge, to deliver the best quality prints. And with the influx of a number of advanced printers, consumers are having a tough time choosing the right printer to buy. Like every year, to make your decision making easier, we put some of the market’s best All-in-One printers to test under various parameters, and fi nd the best one to buy.

 
 
Current Rating 5/5 (2 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

JUST Do It! - Ritam Banerjee

Among all the photographers we have previously featured, perhaps the one thing that has been consistently common is their love for what they do. But even then, there are always some fi xed constructs most of them are comfortable with; someone likes to shoot in the wild, someone likes people against sunsets, etc. Ritam Banerjee, on the other hand, is one of the few photographers we have profi led in the recent past who are as versatile as they are focussed, and still doing all of it on their own terms. Ritam Banerjee is a photographer who has never been associated with one genre, and his fashion images are known to leave as much of an impact on a viewer as his landscape ones. Having been published in a variety of magazines across the world since he started, his love for the art is still the only thing driving him forward. Starting out like most of the other professionals, he got his hands on his first ever SLR camera when he was in college. When one of the first images he shot got published in The Times of India, Pune edition, he decided it was time to take the leap. "It has almost been a decade since that time, and it has been a rather interesting and eventful journey,” he said. Apart from his interest in the subject, inspiration from established photographers at the time also helped him motivate himself towards the point he is at today. "It was my father – a serious hobbyist and a UNESCO Award recipient in photography - who I looked up to while growing up. Then there were photographers like Herb Ritts, Prabuddha Dasgupta, Raghu Rai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Max Vadukul, Annie Leibovitz, Steve McCurry and Richard Avedon. Although my mind wasn’t developed enough to rationalize their visual sentiments at the time, I could still relate to them and appreciate their sensibilities for what they were.”

 
 
Current Rating 3/5 (2 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jodhpur – Beyond the blue horizon

This month’s location for Shoot My City was a peculiar selection, as instead of selecting a monsoon location, we did quite the opposite. Rather than travelling to a serene hill station or a coastal city, we decided to capture the raw beauty of historic Jodhpur, Rajasthan. With distinct pale blue residences that cover the city’s landscape, Jodhpur is also known as the Blue City. Jodhpur is also referred to as Sun City, as it is sunny every day of the year. The ideal time to travel to Jodhpur is from the end of September to March, however, the temperature dips below the 30 degree mark from November onwards. My journey to Jodhpur started from Mumbai by train which got me to Jodhpur at the crack of dawn. On arriving at Jodhpur station, I was greeted by a peacock prancing alongside the railway track, which is quite an odd sight for a Mumbaikar like me. Finally stepping out into the city, I could instantly feel the presence of an aura of its former historic part.

 
 
Current Rating 3/5 (3 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

Pole Photography

Perspective is one of the most important factors in photography. Photographers often strive to find a point of view that no one has explored before. They aspire to see and show the viewer things from an unusual and unique vantage point, and this has urged many to seek elevated positions. Shooting from a higher vantage point is possible with various approaches; right from physically boarding an aircraft or helicopter and shooting subjects below, to the more popular kite aerial photography, to more modern approaches like RC aircraft, helium balloons and so forth. You may have seen it all, but that’s not the end. In recent times, pole photography has become one of the handiest ways of achieving such a perspective. Generally, most images are shot between one and two metres from the ground level, as it is the average height of most people. This regular eye-level shooting is the most common manner in which you click an image. Whereas, changing the angle of view can give you a different perspective. Shooting from a higher angle can give your images a different and fresh perspective, also overlooking various obstructions such as hindering walls, unnecessary flora etc. Pole photography, as the name suggests, is attaching a camera to the end of a pole (or a mast) which is elevated to a height where it is possible to click images from a higher vantage point. In most cases, the camera is triggered wirelessly.

 
 
Current Rating 0/5 (0 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

Camera bags how to keep your equipment in one piece

When we sat to discuss the content for this month’s issue, we came up with some interesting topics. We wanted to look into a topic that might be of great interest to both professional and amateur photographers. Hence, we decided to take up camera bags and how they make life a little easier for a photographer. In terms of equipment, a photographer always has a tough time deciding what he/she wants. Many photographers don’t take this topic too seriously, but you’ll be amazed at how important it can be for photographers. Distributing weight evenly and naturally is what a conventional camera bag should do. Design is one key factor to look into while buying a bag. Given that both the genders constitute the photography fraternity, some bags which are comfortable on men may not be on women, and vice versa.

 
 
Current Rating 0/5 (0 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

Restoring old damaged photographs’

Preserving a memory is perhaps one of the most basic duties performed by a photograph, and for a lot of us, it’s precisely what makes us want to go out and click a picture. Photographs serve as a record of time, and losing pictures, irrespective of whether you’ve clicked them, or if they were a part of an old family photo album, can be heartbreaking and a painful experience. I’ve always believed in getting pictures backed up by printing out digital photographs, at least the good ones, especially since hard drives aren’t fail-proof, and crashes aren’t uncommon. You might end up losing a lot of pictures if you’re not in the habit of getting them printed. Conversely, printed pictures fade over time, and get damaged from exposure to moisture, sunlight, dust, etc. Almost everybody has a photo album lying around somewhere with photographs fading away. Such old photographs are delicate and if they haven’t been preserved properly, chances are they will have incurred some damage. They also tend to stick to each other when stacked up, and incur tears when trying to pry them apart. Humidity damages your photo-prints like nothing else, causing the edges to curl up. Losing a few photos is inevitable but a great deal of them can often be restored with a little effort. A few easy steps can help you preserve your photographs for a lot longer.

 
 
Current Rating 0/5 (0 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

From Darkroom to Lightroom

Darkroom reminds us of the processes that go into developing an exposure in a systematic way. Many consider this a skill, as most of the professionals in the film days took to educating themselves about the darkroom setup. When we say "darkroom setup” we think about the various equipment needed, such as enlarger, enlarger timer, easel, safelight, printing tongs, thermometre, graduates, bottles, funnel, print squeegee, processing chemicals, photographic paper etc. You need to have these basic equipments to process your picture, as not having the right equipment can make it more complicated for you. One of the joys that many photographers will never forget is probably the feeling of watching an image come to life on a blank piece of photo paper. There is nothing quite like the traditional process of printing photographs. It might take longer, but looking at the effort that goes into developing prints you’d be surprised by the results. 

 
 
Current Rating 0/5 (0 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

LG Pocket Photo Printer

LG recently released its Pocket Photo Printer, one of the smallest printers currently available in the market in terms of size. The printer works with mostly all the devices which support an app environment, and all you need to do to get it working is download the LG Pocket Photo app from your respective app market. Its dimensions really stand apart from most, if not all, of its competitors, and the fact that it fits right in your handbag can be a welcome feature for a lot of users. As always, we’d like to review it for our readers looking to buy this for the upcoming festival season. The camera is a tiny 72 x 120 x 24 mm in dimensions and weighs just 215 g, making it apt for students or anyone looking to carry it around. The layout of the printer is minimal, and the lack of any buttons except the on/off one does look pleasing to the eye. The built feels solid in the hand, and even though it’s no smartphone in terms of sleekness it still fits better in your palms than most of its competitors. Technically speaking, as its name might suggest, it did not actually fit in any of our pockets as it’s still too big for that, but printers generally are too bulky to even try doing that. The front and the back of the printer, if one notices, is complete with tiny hearts, which are not that apparent as a design feature unless you look closely.

 
 
Current Rating 4/5 (1 votes) Rate this article 
Share with Friend
 
 
 
 
 
 

Past Issues