SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : September 2013

 

In this Issue

Nikon India introduces AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-140mm ED VR and Speedlight SB-300
Canon introduces its new range of PowerShot cameras
Kingston introduces new enterprise SSD to support big data and virtualisation initiatives
SECURE DIGITAL (SD) MEMORY CARD SHOOT OUT
COMPACT FLASH (CF) MEMORY CARD SHOOTOUT
ARTISTIQUE – A PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST & EXHIBITION
Aesthetics and Architecture
Creating a misty effect with flowing water
To crop or not to crop
Basics of exposure
Exposure Fusion
Canon EOS 100D
Panasonic DMC GF6K
 
 
 
 
 

Nikon India introduces AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-140mm ED VR and Speedlight SB-300

Nikon India has announced the release of the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-140mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR and Speedlight SB-300. The lens is an approximately 7.8x zoom lens, compatible with Nikon DX-format digital SLR cameras. It covers a broad range of focal lengths, from the frequently used wide-angle 18mm to telephoto 140mm. The lens features a Vibration Reduction (VR) function for camera shake compensation equivalent to a shutter speed 4.0 stops faster. It is also equipped with a Silent Wave Motor (SWM) for quiet autofocusing. A maximum diameter of approximately 78 mm, length of approximately 97 mm, and weight of approximately 490 g makes it small and light enough to take anywhere. Its zoom and portability is intended to makes it easy to use with a wide variety of photographic scenes and situations.

 
 
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Canon introduces its new range of PowerShot cameras

Canon has launched four new cameras in its PowerShot range; PowerShot G16, PowerShot S120, PowerShot SX510 HS and PowerShotSX170 IS. The new PowerShot G16 and S120 have a range of exciting new features like the DIGIC 6 image processor, up to 12.2fps continuous shooting in full resolution, Star shooting mode, Background Defocus, as well as HDR mode. The latest budget-zoom PowerShot SX510 HS and SX170 IS is intended to give users a lens at affordable prices. The PowerShot G16 and S120 are PowerShot models designed to feature the fastest Auto Focus (AF) speeds in Canon Compact Camera history. The PowerShot G16 is capable of capturing image at full resolution of up to 12.2 fps in P mode and 5.7 fps with AF, while the PowerShot S120 reaches up to 12.1 fps in P mode and 5.5 fps with AF. The only limitation to the stamina of their burst capability is the amount of memory in the SD card. Powered by Canon’s latest DIGIC 6 imaging processor, both cameras have improved sensitivity to shoot at higher resolutions with less noise in dark conditions. The Dynamic IS now detects and compensates for tilt and parallel movement (shift blur) to create video that’s free of distortion. In addition, the DIGIC 6 Imaging Processor enables video recording in the popular MP4 high-compression format in Full HD resolution, with a smooth 60p frame rate – twice that of earlier models.

 
 
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Kingston introduces new enterprise SSD to support big data and virtualisation initiatives

Kingston Technology Company, Inc. has announced the SSDNow E50, the company’s latest enterpriseclass solid-state drive (SSD). SSDNow E50 intends to enable performance-focused organisations, to obtain the enterprise-level performance at a cost-effective price point. The new entrant is aimed at allowing companies to better perform tasks such as data caching, frequently accessed data within applications, online transactional processing and virtualisation performance. SSDNow E50 also aims to help alleviate I/O latencies and server bottlenecks by providing better IOPS and higher bandwidth. SSDNow E50 features data integrity protection via DuraWrite™ technology that extends the life of the SSD by reducing the number of Flash writes via a compression engine, without sacrificing data integrity. RAISE™ reduces the number of uncorrectable errors in the drive, over and above standard error code correction. To prevent data loss in the event of a power outage or interruption, SSDNow E50 also features power failure protection.

 
 
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SECURE DIGITAL (SD) MEMORY CARD SHOOT OUT

Photographers are no strangers to the world of memory storage devices, as they form an essential part of their day-to-day lives. In the recent years, the Secure Digital (SD) format has become one of the main areas of development in storage technology, due to its application in a host of devices. The focus now is mainly on developing smaller camera bodies, and the SD card provides an ideal companion to the cameras since it allows manufacturers to save vital space. The popularity of the video usage on the DSLRs has also prompted the manufacturers to make faster and higher capacity cards that deliver greater performance. All these exciting developments always make for great ingredients for our shootouts.                                                                                                                                                             

CONTENDERS:  Kingston ultimate SDHC I 300x 16GB Class 10; Extreme Pro SDHC UHS-I 633x 16GB Class 10; Transcend ULTIMATE SDHC UHS-I 566x 16GB Class 10 

 
 
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COMPACT FLASH (CF) MEMORY CARD SHOOTOUT

Although the application or use of the Compact Flash (CF) cards in a DSLR is declining, professional or high-end cameras still continue using the same for its increased processing power and capacity. As camera manufacturers are moving towards smaller and more compact bodies, the system has evolved in such a way that memory cards are said to be the lifeline that holds together the work that the photographer captures with his/her camera. The common things that one looks out for while buying a memory card include technical information like card speed, tech support and even the reputation of the brand. In this month’s Compact Flash shootout, we set aside some of the best CF cards in the market. We recently found that photographers are more comfortable shooting on a 16GB card; hence we informed each manufacturer to send in their best 16 GB options.                                                      

CONTENDERS: Kingston ultimate 600x 16GB; Transcend ULTIMATE 600x 16GB

 
 
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ARTISTIQUE – A PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST & EXHIBITION

On the occasion of World Photography Day, Asian Photography commemorated the art of photography with an initiative called Artistique, an exhibition and photo contest aimed at promoting the culture of photography and pushing it as an art form. Being a premier monthly photography publication, we wanted to initiate a tradition, and after brainstorming with various industry veterans Artistique was born. "The concept was to not just celebrate photography as it is but also to promote it as an art form,” said Bhavya Desai, Editor and Group Head, SAP Magazines. The conceptualisation for Artistique and its contest took shape in a fortnight and the magazine had announced the contest in midweek June, inviting entries from readers around the country to kick-start the process. Participants were required to send in their photographs under three different categories, Black and White, Fashion and Beauty. The pictures came flooding as photographers from all around India sent in their work. The initiative received an overwhelming response, and saw over 2500 entries from under the different themes in merely 45 days.

 
 
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Aesthetics and Architecture

Combining passion with profession is something a lot of us don’t get the chance to do, and success in any one of these aspects often comes at the price of the other. Ali Rangoonwalla, however, has had the competence as well as the opportunity to be able to do what he loves for a living, and being one of most celebrated architectural photographers in the country today, his journey so far has been anything but uneventful. "I received my first camera as a child from my father who was an advanced amateur. Honestly, it opened up a whole new world for me, and I was instantly smitten. I still remember how back then we only had film to shoot on, and the choices were 35mm, 110mm or the medium format. To me it was like a little magic box which seemed to be able to freeze a moment in time. Even today, that is something which astounds me,” says Ali. Starting his career in the corporate field for funding his equipment, photography as a profession was something Ali had always had in mind. Not surprisingly, he quit in two years pursuing what he really wanted, and unlike most of us, he didn’t have any doubts about taking the plunge. 

 
 
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Creating a misty effect with flowing water

Every once a while seeing a beautiful waterscape photograph leaves you wondering as to how the photographer managed to make the sea look so smooth, or water flowing down a fall look so misty. When shooting waterfalls or sea-fronts, capturing the motion of water can produce some stunning results.But while attempting to shoot such photographs, you have to be aware of the type of lighting, the composition and most importantly, the technical aspects to achieve the desired results. While the technique is not difficult, patience is the key here. Read on to understand and master this technique. Invariably, the most important aspect of shooting a landscape, lighting is completely dependent on the sunlight. Considering the ever-changing positions of the sun, timing plays a critical role while trying to achieve a noteworthy landscape image. In this case, timing refers to the time of the day you intend to take your photograph. Showing up early is half the job done, as you cannot expect to get an astonishing shot by simply venturing out at your convenience. The ideal time to get your misty water shot is early in the morning and during sunset. It is not possible to shoot these pictures on a bright sunny day unless you intend to use multiple neutral density filters that darken the entire frame (which in this case is nearly impossible).

 
 
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To crop or not to crop

Some of us like to present our photographs straight-out-ofcamera, and pride in the fact that the pictures are unedited. Whereas many on the other hand, feel there’s nothing wrong with a bit of a touch-up. Among those who feel there’s nothing wrong with editing are also photographers who indulge in cropping because they may have composed sloppily. While cropping is not a sin, it’s always a plus if you can envision beforehand the picture you want to take, as it will help improve your visualisation skills. Cropping a picture on a computer, after you’ve clicked it, moreover, will result in a loss of resolution. So, if you are planning on cropping, it’s best you do it right. The ideal scenario is that all the photos you click turn out to be perfectly composed pictures. However, practically speaking, most pictures can use some improvement. Quite often, a simple crop can turn a mediocre image to a superior one, but remember to never crop your only version of a photo. Some software destroy the original and replace them with the cropped version once you’re done. So, it’s always a good idea to create a copy, and then begin the cropping process.

 
 
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Basics of exposure

Exposure can be defined as the amount of light that enters the sensor during the process of shooting a picture. Controlling the exposure of a photograph is critical in getting the precise kind of lighting you intend in a photograph. Understanding exposure can be a daunting task for a beginner. Although the idea of what is appropriate exposure is subjective, on an average most viewers tend to agree on whether an image appears too dark or too light. There are no rules or set standards for appropriate exposure; the general aim is to produce an image that resembles the scene being photographed exactly the way the eye perceives it. It is common to get confused about f-numbers and aperture, not knowing the changes that shutter speeds can bring to one’s pictures. But the chances are that you might not go far in photography without understanding what is good and bad exposure. Although we’ve covered this subject several times, we thought it’d be a good idea to refresh your memory, especially for those of you who’re just starting out. There are three adjustable elements that control the exposure of an image, namely shutter speed, aperture, and ISO.

 
 
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Exposure Fusion

Most of you may have seen High Dynamic Range (HDR) images, wherein majority of the subjects contain impeccable detail and surreal lighting. Digital cameras have a limited dynamic range, which is lower than what we actually see in the real world. In HDR frames, with vast differences in the highlights, midtones and shadows, the photograph produced can turn out to be underexposed or overexposed. In this case, a bracketed exposure sequence of different exposures helps in acquiring a full dynamic range, which in turn helps creating a higher dynamic range image. Sometimes you may even think that HDR images are a product of Computer Graphics (CG), and it might not appeal that well to everybody. In this month’s issue we’ll be discussing a relatively new concept - Exposure Fusion. Similar to HDR, a series of bracketed exposures are fused together to create a final image. It creates an Exposure Fusion, which is nothing but a summary of the best tonalities from each exposure, and combines them to create a single image. The fusion process creates an image on the basis of luminosity, saturation and contrast, and balances these three factors to make a single image.

 
 
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Canon EOS 100D

Having introduced new cameras in the semi-professional and professional range in recent days, Canon’s bold move to go small with its new entrant, the EOS 100D, was unexpected. Packed with an 18 megapixel APS-C loaded with a DIGIC 5 image processor, Canon’s latest is the smallest DSLR in its arsenal. Let’s see how the 100D performs and whether it can make a lasting impression on today’s market. The most noticeable attribute of the Canon EOS 100D is its petite size; measuring 4.60 x 3.57 x 2.74 inches and weighing 407 g, it is the smallest DSLR camera that Canon has ever made. The EOS 100D is a step higher than the EOS 600D and shares similar technical specifications with the EOS 700D, with the exception of its size. The Canon EOS 100D has a textured handgrip which provides sufficient depth to give a firm grip to the camera, along with the textured thumb pad at the back. All of Sample Image the major controls on the 100D are atypical to the entry level EOS range, like the ISO button, focus point selection, exposure lock, depth of field button and so on. The back of the camera hosts the maximum controls with the SET/Quick selection button (Q) with the four way directional controller. Unlike the other cameras in the EOS series, Canon has done away with the shortcut functions assigned to the directional controller. The fact that they have to be accessed manually using the Q button can be inconvenient.

 
 
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Panasonic DMC GF6K

An entry level proposition in the mirrorless arena, the Panasonic Lumix GF6 is a good example of where mirrorless interchangeable-lens cameras (MILC) stand in the market today. After numerous range of camera models through the years, manufacturers are finally able streamline the features on offer in this segment. Conveniently small in size, the GF6 packs a host of clever features, and is a significant improvement over the GF5, its predecessor. At first glance, the camera is attractive to look at. Despite the small size of the camera, the textured handgrip on the right gives a secure feel in your hand. The chrome plated top panel combined with the black body lends the camera a stylish retro appeal. When compared to its predecessor, the main changes appear to be the addition of a mode dial on the top plate, along with a zoom lever that encircles the shutter button. The GF6 has a built-in flash that pops out of the top plate. However, the camera lacks a port for an external viewfinder or a hot shoe for attaching a more powerful flash. The tilting screen is also a new addition, and it can be turned 180 degree, allowing one to shoot self portraits easily. The articulated screen is also of a higher resolution as compared to its predecessors.

 
 
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