SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : July 2013

 

In this Issue

Epson launches new range of mono ink tank system printers
Fujifilm launches X-M1
Instagram introduces video mode on app
Talk to me
Battery shootout - AA rechargeable battery
Infrared Photography
Magnify your image
Adding colour to black and white photos
Olympus SH-50
 
 
 
 
 

Epson launches new range of mono ink tank system printers

Epson recently announced the launch of its new M-series range of Mono Ink Tank Inkjet printers. The M-series range of monochrome inkjet printers are for corporates who primarily print black and white documents, and who demand the low running costs possible along with good print quality. Epson says its M-series printers can print at just one third the cost of even low quality refilled laser toners used in laser printers. That’s 12 paise a page for black & white prints. Epson also claims that the M series uses one fourth of the electricity of equivalent laser printers. "When many people think of office printing in India they think laser. We are here to change this. I am absolutely confident that our M-series printers will drive the shift from laser to inkjet printing,” says Toshiyuki Kasai – President, Epson India.

 
 
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Fujifilm launches X-M1

Fujifilm Corporation announces the launch of the Fujifilm X-M1, the third interchangeable-lens camera from the company. The camera features the same 16.3 megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS Sensor as the Fujifilm X-Pro 1 and the Fujifilm X-E1. The X-M1 has the retro feel of the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-E1 cameras. The X-M1 weighs 330 grams despite incorporating a large APS-C CMOS sensor, a tiltable highdefinition LCD monitor, a built-in flash, wireless image transfer and a hot shoe.The X-M1 will be available in three colors: black, silver and brown. A compact XC16-50mm f3.5-5.6 OIS zoom lens (24mm-76mm equivalent) is being launched with the X-M1 as a Kit lens and is designed to complement the camera, covering the focal lengths of 24mm to 76mm). The XC16-50mm lens consists of 12 all-glass elements in 10 groups including three aspherical elements and 1 ED element. It features seven round-edged aperture blades, which offers 17 stops in 1/3 EV steps for aperture control. The lens will be available in two variations: black and silver.

 
 
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Instagram introduces video mode on app

Last month, Instagram introduced Video mode on the app; another way to share your stories. When you go to take a photo on Instagram, you’ll now see a movie camera icon. Tap it to enter video mode, where you can take up to 15 seconds of video through the Instagram camera. Instagram has also added 13 filters built specifically for video. When you post a video, you’ll also be able to select your favourite scene from what you’ve recorded as your cover image. So what does this mean for your content? Nothing’s different from photos. Instagram says it is still committed to making sure you have control over all of your content. Only the people who you let see your photos will be able to see your videos. And as with photos, you own your videos. Instagram for iOS version 4.0 is currently available for download in Apple’s App Store and Instagram for Android version 4.0 is now available on Google Play.

 
 
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Talk to me

One of the most undervalued elements of a photo shoot is communication. When I decided to write on this topic my first inclination was to say ‘simple’ communication, but my experience with shooting for over 10 years in fashion and advertisement photography has proven that there is nothing simple about it. Even with the assembly of a highly professional team of experts in their respective fields, any photo shoot will be hindered and flawed without clear and concise communication. No one can read your mind, and I am fairly confident in saying that you can’t read minds either. Without straight forward and succinct communication between all team members on the shoot, huge gaps of information will just be filled with misconception and ultimately poor work and frustration. There are many hats that I wear on a photo shoot and one of those is that of a team leader. It is very important that I am clear on my direction for the course of the shoot and what the intention of it actually is, so that ultimately everyone concerned is on the same page.

 
 
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Battery shootout - AA rechargeable battery

It is that time of the year once again where we commence the shootouts that Asian Photography is known for. And to start the proceedings, this month we feature the AA Rechargeable battery shootout. Although most photographic equipment have adopted custom made lithium batteries for specific needs, rechargeable batteries still remain an imperative part of a photographer’s kit. We all use batteries; be it for camera flashes or television remotes and AA batteries are still used in most of today’s electronics. As a continuous effort to make the shootouts more competitive and fair we keep on expanding the horizons. In this year’s shootout we feature the Camelion AlwaysReady, envie infinite, Uniross Hybrio and Varta Longlife Accu. Majority of the manufacturers offer pre-charged or Ready-to-use (RTU) AA batteries these days. But in order for us to be fair we drained each battery because the longevity for each battery was significantly different from one manufacturer to the other. Most pre-charged rechargeable batteries are not always dependable. This shootout is aimed at giving the readers an idea of how to understand batteries and make an informed choice. So let’s see how these AA rechargeable batteries fare against each other.

 
 
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Infrared Photography

Infrared photography can make for a fascinating experiment and often it will land you stunning images of landscapes, foliage and outdoors. As the name suggests, in infrared photography, the camera captures the infrared light emitted from a scene and that renders the photographs surreal. Infrared light isn’t normally visible to the human eye, but in some circumstances it’s possible to capture it with your camera. The light spectrum has colour hues from violet through blue, followed by green, yellow and orange, progressing to red and deep red. The spectrum of light is measured in nanometers, where wavelength of violet is 400nm; moving on to blue which is 460nm, to green at 540nm, followed by yellow at 600nm and red at 750nm. There are ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) radiations, before violet and beyond deep red respectively, which cannot be seen by the human eye. Infrared (IR) radiation starts above the wavelength of 750nm and continues approximately till 20,000nm. IR photography captures IR radiation between the range of 750nm and 1300nm. The sensors used in digital cameras are sensitive to light with wavelengths of up to 950nm, which includes IR light range. A simple test to check is to point a television remote towards the camera lens and press any button on it. If you see a light on the LCD display that you cannot see with your naked eye implies that your camera is sensitive to infrared light.

 
 
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Magnify your image

Few months ago we indulged in close-up photography using a conventional macro lens. This time we are going to arrive at the same result using a different technique using a less expensive glass. We are going to make use of a magnifying glass and add a creative look to our subjects. Using a magnifying lens may not be the best way to shoot macro, but it is fun experimenting with nonetheless. This medium of glass gives a unique feel to the over-all image. With a magnifying glass at your disposal you can try capturing macro shots, where you shoot through the glass to magnify the object or subject. A magnifying glass can be a source of experimenting in everyday photography, but note that the optical quality of a magnifying glass is nowhere as high as a macro lens. Here you’ll tend to get soft edges and more colour fringing in your images. However you can make use of such an effect in giving a different view to your subjects. 

 
 
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Adding colour to black and white photos

With the help of latest photo-editing software, it is now possible to colourise your vintage black and white photographs. Bringing out accurate colour, true to the scene shot is challenging and time consuming, but it’s still worth a shot. You could start with a photograph with fewer elements to colour. We used Adobe Photoshop with the illustrated example. The first step, once you’ve decided on a picture to colour up, is to check the image’s Colour Mode.

 
 
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Olympus SH-50

Just a few months back Olympus launched their Stylus series, with a variety of advanced compact point-andshoot cameras that combine some stunning features and great design. Olympus is known for its innovations especially in today’s compact mirrorless cameras such as the OM-D E-M5 and the PEN series. This time the camera manufacturer has raised the bar in providing some high-end features in a compact camera body. We have been waiting to get our hands on the new Olympus SH-50. Here’s what we have to say about the camera.

 
 
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