SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : June 2013

 

In this Issue

Canon launches zoom lens with built-in 1.4x extender
Nikon bags TIPA awards 2013 for four products
SANDISK APPOINTS NEW INDIA COUNTRY MANAGER
Nissin introduces flash unit Di700
Importance of a theme
Adeel Halim’s streets
Dual tone photography
When darkness falls
Don’t turn off the lights
Pick the right glass
Canon EOS 6D
Olympus Stylus SZ-16
 
 
 
 
 

Canon launches zoom lens with built-in 1.4x extender

Canon has announced the launch of the new EF200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x, a new L-series lens designed for professional users. This latest entry into Canon’s L-series lenses is equipped with an internal 1.4x extender. With this extender, the 200-400mm lens is able to extend its zoom to 200-560mm range. The EF200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x combines a zoom lens with a fixed focal length lens. The lens is able to maintain a minimum focal distance of 2m throughout its entire zoom range, even at 560mm telephoto zoom end. The EF200-400mm f/4L IS USM Extender 1.4x has a Power Focus (PF) mode which when engaged, enables focus shift at a consistent speed by rotating the playback ring. Focus shift speed can also be switched between two speeds depending on the angle the ring is rotated to.

 
 
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Nikon bags TIPA awards 2013 for four products

Nikon India, 100% subsidiary of Nikon Corporation announced that four of its products - the Nikon D7100 D-SLR camera, the Coolpix S01, Coolpix P520, and the 1 NIKKOR 11-27.5mm f/3.5-5.6 normal zoom lens for Nikon 1 cameras are the recipients of the prestigious TIPA Awards 2013 for photographic and imaging products. The winners for best photographic and imaging products in different categories announced between April 01, 2012 and March 31, 2013 were selected through voting by editors of member camera and imaging magazines from Europe, Australia, Canada, China, the United States of America, and South Africa. Hiroshi Takashina, Managing Director, Nikon India said, "It is an honour to be awarded by such a distinguished panel of experts acknowledging some of the most remarkable products from Nikon’s portfolio. TIPA Awards 2013 has helped us substantiate our continuous efforts to provide best in class products which are equipped with enhanced technology and innovation.”

 
 
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SANDISK APPOINTS NEW INDIA COUNTRY MANAGER

SanDisk Corporation has announced the appointment of Rajesh Gupta as the new country manager for SanDisk India with immediate effect. Previously, Gupta was the director of sales for SanDisk in India. Prior to his time at SanDisk, he worked for Intel Corporation for 15 years, last serving as the director of sales and marketing for Intel Technology India. "Rajesh has more than two decades of proven sales and marketing success in the IT industry. We are pleased to appoint him as the new country manager of India to continue SanDisk’s growth in the region,” said Gavin Wu, Vice President, Asia Pacific, SanDisk. Gupta will focus on continuing to strengthen the company’s presence in the country and is tasked with taking its growth to the next level. He will oversee the retail sales and marketing of memory cards, USB and SSD products through leveraged distribution channels that cover major cities and markets across India.

 
 
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Nissin introduces flash unit Di700

The Nissin Di700 comes with a colourful LCD control panel and selector dial. It offers focal length range coverage of 24-200mm. It can achieve maximum output of GN54 at 200mm. The Nissin Di700 has new rotating lock release buttons. The flash head rotates horizontally 180° to right and left, tilts up to 90°and expanded 7°of downward tilt, which is suitable for close up photography. The flash unit supports high-speed synchronisation, wireless TTL mode, external service ports to meet professional requirements, and quick loading design.

 
 
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Importance of a theme

I am often asked about where my inspiration comes from. I do draw inspiration from every day life and lean towards the fashion imagery you see in Europe, but I think the question that is really being asked here, especially from young photographers, is how do I really create my images? There is a basic three-part process to my image making. Firstly, establishing of a clear theme, following which I refine the concept further, followed by the execution at the actual shoot combined with my ability to naturally capture the moments. The entire shoot is driven from the kernel of an idea I refer to as the theme. Why is choosing a primary theme for your shoot so important? The reasons lay in the fact that there are so many decisions and possibilities that can go into a single image. Choices include everything from lighting to location, model, and, in case of fashion photography, make up, hair and styling as well. In my experience, the pivotal moment during the shoot is right at the start of the development. I have seen that so many young photographers find themselves confused, and even seasoned clients are pressed for time, not clarifying the idea and hence seriously impacting a shoot that they have paid considerable amounts for.

 
 
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Adeel Halim’s streets

His interest was in experiencing everyday life in different cities and their diverse cultures. And he thought perhaps photography could give him the opportunity to live that life. In his second year of law studies, he decided to make photography his profession. This month Adeel Halim speaks to Asian Photography about his journey from a start in Reuters to now, being an independent photographer and film maker. When Halim started his journey in photography, he was instantly impressed by the thought process of photojournalists, the innumerable experiences they had at a young age and their constant hope of getting a great picture which would become historical and be talked of by the world long after they are gone. Also for some, he noticed, photojournalism was a hope of change. "Photojournalism is inspirational. Some pictures have changed the world and some are changing the world.” Today, after almost eight years of working as a photojournalist, Halim still feels strongly connected with the profession and feels glad he made the right decision.

 
 
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Dual tone photography

A technique in photography can often be converted into an interesting piece of art. In today’s digital world, be it still or movie, photographers and cameramen are not only trying new angles and compositions but also adding new looks to their frames. One such technique is of adding tones to images. If you have noticed tones in images are not something new; they have been a part of photography ever since the days of the pin hole cameras. They have rendered beauty to photographs for many years. Tones consist of darks against lights in a photo. Dual or split tone photography is one of the simplest steps in developing two range of colours in one photograph. It is nothing but an individual tonal colour applied to the image’s highlights and shadows. One tonal colour for highlights and a different tonal colour for shadows, which are combined to give a split or a dual tone in the photograph.

 
 
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When darkness falls

Shooting in brightly lit conditions is easy as your camera is invariably likely to deliver a good image. Shooting in low light is not quite the same deal. Dimly lit interiors, and outdoors after sunset present their own challenges. It doesn’t however mean that you stop shooting when the light begins to diminish. Knowing how to use your camera and incorporating a few techniques can help you overcome the obstacles associated with low light shooting. Here are a few problems that most of us have encountered while shooting in low light conditions, and the ways to solve them.

 

 
 
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Don’t turn off the lights

Continuous lighting in photography implies using a constant light source to light the subject. This means that the lights stay on during the entire photo shoot instead of using bursts of strobe lights. For amateur photographers shooting with a continuous light source is easy as they can anticipate where the highlights and shadows will appear in the photo before taking a picture. Besides, the lighting setup involved with a continuous light source is easier and cheaper as compared to using studio strobes or flash units which need a triggering mechanism.                                                                         One of the most important factors while shooting is the white balance. Flash units or studio strobes are always balanced to the colour temperature of sunlight. But the colour temperature drastically changes while dealing with continuous lights. Most digital SLRs include an array of white balance preset settings for Tungsten light, CFL tubes, Daylight, Overcast light and some also allow you to set a specific colour temperature in Kelvin.

 
 
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Pick the right glass

A frequently asked question by many is this: which lens is the best for me? Choosing the right lens is an important decision for any photographer. And one lens simply may not suffice. With the growing popularity of photography as a hobby and profession today, a lot of people are buying DSLR cameras. However, what they don’t realise often is that owning a DSLR is a continuous investment if you want to get the most out of it. When you buy a DSLR with its kit lens, there is bound to come a point when you want to achieve different results in your images and feel stuck not knowing which lens to invest in to do the same. The beauty of lenses is that they can help you compose a scene unlike the way the human eye sees it. The Human eye is like a fixed focal length, which has the same field of view. Lenses are interchangeable, hence enabling you to look at the world with many fields of view. Each lens can lend a different perspective to the frame you capture. Different lenses come with different specifications such as F/number, focal length, macro, IS (image stabiliser) and so on. Two most important factors to consider in a lens are sensor size and aperture. All these specifications put together help in selecting a lens, provided you know what you want to achieve with it. Lenses are divided into wide, standard and telephoto. In this article we tell you which lens to choose for which specific condition.

 
 
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Canon EOS 6D

Not much long after Nikon’s launch of the full-frame D600, Canon followed with the announcement of the relatively lower priced full-frame Canon EOS 6D, making full-frame DSLR performance far more easily accessible in terms of pricing at least. The EOS 6D is built around a new Canon CMOS sensor, which offers a pixel count of 20.2 MP, a slightly reduced pixel count than the higher priced 5D Mark III. Interesting new features include integrated GPS and Wi-Fi, which allows you to control the camera even with a smartphone 

EOS 6D is a little similar in control layout and dimensions to the popular EOS 60D with a bit of the Canon EOS 5D Mark III thrown in. Canon claimed it was the lightest DSLR in the market at the time of the launch. Most of the buttons are laid out for use with the right hand. Other than the power-on switch, the mode dial, a menu and an info button, there’s nothing for the left hand. The cluster of buttons for use with the right hand can get a little confusing for someone starting out with a Canon EOS camera, but a little getting-used-to is all it takes to get beyond that. There are handy buttons for accessing important functions like Picture Style, White Balance, Drive mode, Auto Focus adjustments, etc. above the top-plate LCD screen, along with a button to illuminate the same. A switch and button control next to the viewfinder allows you to enter live view and start recording when in the video mode.

 
 
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Olympus Stylus SZ-16

Olympus SZ-16 is a mega zoom point-and-shoot camera. The compact SZ-16 comprises of a high performance 24x optical mega zoom, its stellar feature, along with a CMOS image sensor that sports a 16 megapixel to deliver high resolution images and full HD movies. If that’s not enough, this compact point-and-shoot features the TruePic V Image Processor straight from the more expensive,Olympus PEN series cameras.                                       

The first feature that impressed us was the camera’s design. Olympus has ensured that the SZ-16 is neatly designed with prompt function buttons at the right places. The camera’s design is simple and user friendly. The camera has a sturdy hold but the thumb rest at the rear part of the camera could have been better designed to complement the grip The front of the camera is primarily covered by the lens; the 24x wide optical high performance zoom installed in the camera. The top of the SZ-16 is minimalistic. The shutter release button is surrounded by the wide and telephoto swivel switch. Next to the shutter release is the power button with a red light in the centre indicating power on. The pop-up flash is just above the lens and it needs to be activated manually by a sliding switch that is placed next to it.

 
 
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