SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : March 2013

 

In this Issue

Life as he knows it
The art of levitation
Midday Madness
Explore your compact camera
Olympus PEN E-PL5
Sony NEX-6
 
 
 
 
 

Life as he knows it

Graduating from taking pictures on family vacations and developing them at home using the bathroom as a darkroom to landing a part-time job through a school programme, in the photo department of a newspaper in Dallas didn’t take too long for David Butow. And it’s the decision he made then, of pursuing newspaper photography as a profession that has taken him places and resulted in some of the most honest photo representations of areas affected with war and calamities. He talks to Asian Photography about photojournalism, the good and bad of it, and how some of his projects changed the way he sees the world today.

 
 
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The art of levitation

Looking to bring some magic into your photos? We’ve got an easy tutorial for you to help you do just that. This month, it’s time to rise up in the air, quite literally! With a little bit of planning and some postproduction, we’ll help you create the illusion of levitation in your photos. To begin with, there is more than one way to do this. We’ve discussed two ways to achieve this effect in your pictures.                                                                                  

One way to achieve this illusion is to use a fast shutter speed in order to freeze all action completely in your frame. This method doesn’t require any post-production. However, a little planning will help make a difference to your images. Using a fast shutter speed automatically implies that you’ll need to take measures to ensure lighting in your picture is adequate. Using a flash might help light your subject properly. We’d recommend using it off-camera, as a slave, ideally, so the lighting doesn’t make your subject appear flat. But that isn’t necessary. You could use the on-camera flash to light up your subject too. Depending on what your subject is, you might need more than one light source to light up your subject. A greater deal can be achieved with multiple flash units.

 
 
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Midday Madness

It is a rule in photography that the best time to head out to shoot is during the golden hours (After sunrise and before sunset). Most of us love to capture images during the golden hours but what about the rest of the day, which consists of the majority? That is a challenge we help you deal with. It is not easy to shoot during those hours where the light from the sun is more direct and harsh. It leaves you with images that are flat, blown out and lack detail. The downward direction of the light creates strong shadows; faces will have deep shadows in the eye sockets, which give a very skull-kind appearance and landscapes will look flat and boring as the harsh light affects the colours. Let’s put it this way, what if you have a rare subject to photograph and it is right there in front of you to be captured? Well, sometimes it’s not possible to shoot a subject at the golden hours and you just have to capture the moment it is in front of you. For this, you will need to be technically skilled to take on the challenge of shooting during mid-day light. We give you a few tips on how and what you can shoot during the midday sun.

 
 
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Explore your compact camera

These days a number of people choose to buy a DSLR over a compact digital camera. Reasons are excellent picture quality and the professional feel that the user gets while shooting with a DSLR. But what good is it if you don’t opt to upgrade from the standard 18-55 mm kit lens to an array of lens, or when you can’t carry it around everywhere because of its size and weight? That’s when you should buy yourself a compact digital camera which you can take with you wherever you go. And, no, using a compact camera is not just about pressing the button and letting the camera do the rest. You can do a whole lot more with just that little machine in your hands. We tell you how to make the most of your compact digital camera. 

 
 
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Olympus PEN E-PL5

The Olympus PEN E-PL5 is a beauty in its design and performance. This camera is set to be one of PEN’s best compact series till date. The Olympus PEN E-PL5 sits in the mid-level category in the company’s line of compact Micro Four Third cameras. It is said that the Olympus PEN E-PL5 shares a few features from the high end, Olympus OM-D E-M5; the same 16.1- megapixel High-Speed Live MOS sensor, and the new TruePic VI image processor. We got down to exploring the camera further.                                                                       

As we took this newcomer out of the box, we noticed that the E-PL5 takes the same concept of adding a removable grip from the E-P3 but is lighter in weight than the E-P3. The E-PL5 feels good in hand; there is a thumb rest at the rear part of the camera which provides a good grip. The design is such that the user can have a sturdy grip even while holding the camera with one hand.

 
 
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Sony NEX-6

Since its launch in 2010 with its mid-range NEX-5 and entry -level NEX-3 in the handycam and professional video camera segment, Sony’s NEX series has come a long way. One of the latest entrants in the NEX family is the NEX-6 which was launched at Photokina 2012. The younger sibling of the NEX-7, the range-finder styled 16.1 Megapixel NEX-6 is Wi-Fi compatible and is compliant with on-camera apps.                                                                            

The NEX -6 looks similar to its predecessor, the NEX-7. The front of the camera has the proprietary E-mount along with a deep rubberised hand grip. The handgrip in the front extends to the thumb rest at the back providing a secure and Since its launch in 2010 with its mid-range NEX-5 and entry -level NEX-3 in the handycam and professional video camera segment, Sony’s NEX series has come a long way. One of the latest entrants in the NEX family is the NEX-6 which was launched at Photokina 2012. The younger sibling of the NEX-7, the range-finder styled 16.1 Megapixel NEX-6 is Wi-Fi compatible and is compliant with on-camera apps. comfortable grip. The top of the camera houses a hot shoe, a built-in pop-up flash and a PASM mode dial which extends to a sloped platform which has the shutter button with a power switch integrated around it, and a dedicated Function (Fn) button. The hot shoe is a newly developed Multi Interface shoe which is for ISO standard hotshoe flash units. It also has the proprietary connector strip under the lip at the front, for Sony accessories.

 
 
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