SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : October 2012

 

In this Issue

BenQ announces launch of GH600 and GH700
Fujifilm launches X-E1
Olympus Imaging India appoints new Managing Director
Sekonic goes the Touch Way
How to use a LIGHT METER
Using a Flatbed Scanner as a Camera
Dodge and Burn
Product Photography
JORDAN Every Bit Exotic
“Saying that smart phones are not going to create any impact on the camera industry may not be right.”
 
 
 
 
 

BenQ announces launch of GH600 and GH700

BenQ, a provider of digital lifestyle innovations has announced the launch of its first high zoom bridge type digital camera series – the GH600 and GH700. The cameras feature a 21x optical zoom with 16-megapixel and 25mm wide-angle view, combining O.I.S. support, 1cm Super Macro Mode and a 3 inch 460k LCD screen. The GH600 shoots HD 720p videos at 30 frames per second with zoom for fluid movement in fast-action scenes. The aspherical lens adopted to enhance the lens’ focus is made of high-transmission, low-dispersion material and a nanoscale, anti-reflection coating.

 
 
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Fujifilm launches X-E1

Following the X-Pro1, Fujifilm recently unveiled X-E1, its second interchangeable lens camera. With its portable size and fast autofocus speed, the X-E1 promises to be an exciting addition to the X series range. X-E1 offers 16 megapixel APS-C X-Trans CMOS Sensor with OLED electronic viewfinder, a smaller body with built-in flash and the X mount for the Fujinon XF lens range. In addition, Fujifilm expanded the lens line-up for its interchangeable cameras from three single focal length lenses in the first series to five with an addition of two lenses, a F2.8 super wide 14mm (21mm in 35mm equivalent) single focal length lens and a F2.8-4 zoom lens that covers the shooting range of 18mm to 55mm (27-83mm in 35mm equivalent). Another line of five lenses will be added to the XF lens series in early 2013, making the total to 10 lenses. Unlike the X-Pro1 with its hybrid multi viewfinder, the X-E1 camera boasts an OLED electronic viewfinder (EVF) with a resolution of 2.36 million dots.

 
 
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Olympus Imaging India appoints new Managing Director

Olympus Imaging India announced the appointment of Kenichiro Mori as its new Managing Director, overseeing Olympus Imaging Corporation’s operations in the region with effect from September 1st, 2012. Mori san is now responsible for leading the overall growth and profitability of the company within the region. Mori-san, aged 37, has over 14 years of diversified experience in Olympus from the sales of Microscopes and its accessories, to the sales, marketing and communication of the various product categories within the imaging business. He has been at the position of Regional Manager in Germany and later Division Manager, Consumer Division in Russia. During his tenure, Mori-san honed his expertise across various markets including Europe, Asia and Middle Eastern countries.

 
 
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Sekonic goes the Touch Way

Sekonic has recently launched Litemaster Pro L-478D and Litemaster Pro L-478DR, which touchscreen operated photo and cine meters. The Sekonic Litemaster Pro’s colour LCD (2.7”) displays ambient, flash, cine and other information in a clear way. Settings are made by simply touching or sliding a finger over the screen. The L-478D/DR can be calibrated to your camera using Sekonic’s Data Transfer software and either Sekonic or X-Rite Brand targets or by manually inputting data to the DTS programme or on the meter itself. The L-478DR incorporates Pocket Wizard wireless technology for in-meter power control of select studio flashes connected to PocketWizard ControlTL receivers as well as standard triggering with the entire PocketWizard wireless family. The MRP of L-478D is `30,000 and L-478DR is `35,000 (inclusive of all taxes).

 
 
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How to use a LIGHT METER

The cameras today are capable of multiple functions. With all the latest sensors, image processing software, multi level metering and flash exposure modes, it is important to have a grip on the exposure of your photographs. getting to know your meter is vital; the more you understand it, the better the images are likely to turn out.

METERING

There are two types of metering modes, namely reflective metering and incident metering. Reflective metering reads the intensity of light reflecting off the subject, which the camera’s built-in meter reads, whereas incident metering reads the intensity of light falling on the subject, which a handheld light meter reads. You might wonder why you should invest so much in a handheld light meter when you have one built in the camera.

 
 
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Using a Flatbed Scanner as a Camera

Flatbed scanners, normally used to scan documents, photos or film, can also be used to capture stunning still life "photographs”. On a day when you’re probably feeling a little bored with your camera and feel like taking a break from it, you could use your flatbed scanner to make some interesting pictures. Bringing the scanner to your subject might not always be feasible, but instead you could bring your subject to the scanner. Using it to capture day-to-day scenes outdoors is a lot more challenging, on account of the many variables. It is a kind of slow camera that takes shots of single rows and then assembles them together as a photograph. Whether or not it can be called photography has been debated for quite some time but despite the many restrictions it poses, it can at the very least be called a form of photography, since it does enable you to capture images of your subjects.

 
 
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Dodge and Burn

Dodging and burning are procedures employed in post-processing still images to retrieve maximum exposure information from them. These procedures were first employed with black and white film in order to bring out the most from the pictures taken. With the digital medium, these processes work similarly, but with the added benefit of being able to preview your results real time on your screens. While digital dodging and burning will never replicate traditional techniques entirely, the principle of adjusting the brightness of local detail is intact, and there are more than a few ways to achieve it using Photoshop and similar image editing software. Traditionally, dodging was performed in a darkroom by holding back the exposure from the enlarger lamp, usually using a small piece of black card or metal affixed at the end of a thin rod. By moving it constantly during the exposure, the edges of the area being held back were softened and the shadow of the rod was unnoticeable. Burning was the exact opposite, adding extra time to pre-selected areas after the initial overall exposure, usually using a shaped hole either cut into a large piece of black card or even by cupping the hands.

 
 
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Product Photography

If you notice, we are surrounded by advertisements of one product or the other in newspapers, magazines and on the internet. Some of the images of products even succeed in making you want those products. Any kind of photography that deals with still photographs of inanimate objects for their promotion and marketing is referred to as product photography. This can range from sophisticated photographs of perfumes in glossy international magazines to the product the catalogues that turn up in your mail box. In its current commercial form, still life photography falls into two categories; large and small. Small is called table top photography which is restricted by the size of the table the product is shot on. The product could be anything from a watch, to a TV, to a sumptuous banquet. Large includes everything else from room sets to cars to aircraft. When compared to photographing a living being, shooting a product is very different, since there is no element of spontaneity and everything is under the photographer’s control. The photographer has to himself create or obtain everything appearing in the frame camera. Product photography is highly pre-produced and pre-visualised. Here, photographers do not capture images, they construct images.

 
 
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JORDAN Every Bit Exotic

With a rich historical heritage and its importance etched in the history of mankind, Jordan seems to send mixed signals to travellers upon arrival. For instance the Queen alia International airport doesn’t exactly stand as a statue of romantic notion that its name seems to suggest. Nor is it impressive enough, it feels more like the Indira Gandhi International airport of yore, its pre-T3 avatar. But one can easily notice a lot of construction in progress, which gives a clear indication of what is to follow. Picking up our luggage we head for Jarash, our first stop in Jordan, which rightfully deserves to be called an exotic kingdom. Jarash is grand, to say the least. acknowledged as the largest and bestpreserved roman city outside of the erstwhile roman empire, it is a fascinating archeological site, less than an hours drive north of amman, Jordan’s capital. Its ruins are a testament to the architectural height and geographical expanse reached by the romans.

 
 
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“Saying that smart phones are not going to create any impact on the camera industry may not be right.”

With the festivities already having commenced with Onam, like every year, most manufacturers have bet big money in anticipation of lucrative business. Bhavya Desai spoke to Alok Bharadwaj, Sr Vice President, Canon India about the company’s plans this season and more.

Undoubtedly the festival season is one of the most awaited periods for the consumer electronic and digital imaging industry. Essentially there are two periods when the camera industry is at its peak in terms of sales; during summer vacations (April-May) and during the festivals (October-February). "It is indeed one of the critical phases of the camera industry for registering business and expansion. Rollout of festivals typically begins with Onam in Kerala, followed by Ganpati in Maharashtra and the Durga Pooja in Kolkata,” said Alok Bharadwaj, Sr Vice President, Canon India. The digital compact camera segment, however, seems to be experiencing some depression in the consumer sentiments these days. And there are two reasons for the same. First, the overall macro economic situation and second, that photo-taking is slowly getting impacted by alien factors. "No doubt that a lot of consumers are using smartphones over what they were doing earlier. And saying that smartphones are not going to create any impact on camera industry may not be right. I feel that smartphones are definitely changing the way people use camera phones.

 
 
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