SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 

Past Issue : June 2012

 

In this Issue

NEWS - Olympus India Inaugurates Level IV Master Service Center for India
COLUMN - Using Natural Light – Part 1
ON THE HORIZON - She’s Going Hollywood Tonight
TIPS & TECHS - Panorama
1 in a many
Composition
Studio Portrait Lighting Patterns
CAMERA REVIEW - Nikon D800
CAMERA REVIEW - Olympus OM-D E-M5
 
 
 
 
 

NEWS - Olympus India Inaugurates Level IV Master Service Center for India

Olympus Imaging, leader in opto-digital technology, recently announced the opening of its first, Level IV Master Service Centre (MSC) in India. Located at its India headquarter in Mumbai, the Master Service Center is designed to international standards to offer after sales services for all Olympus Imaging equipment under one roof, and will cater to products ranging from cameras to binoculars to digital voice recorders. The new Level IV Master Service Center is equipped with all the necessary tools with a resolution tester service, for adjustment of the Olympus professional lenses, DSLRs and mirrorless interchangeable lens systems.

 
 
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COLUMN - Using Natural Light – Part 1

I spend a lot of time thinking about light in context to photography. In fact, when I first started with photography, there was a period of time where I was completely obsessed with observing light. Everywhere I went I would "see” the light. At all times of the day, in all types of lighting conditions, I would consciously make mental notes of where the light was coming from, how the light was falling, how it moved, bent and reflected and I trained my eye to see the light’s colour.

Gradually, I immersed myself in the study of light in order to bring more to my images and become skilled to best use the natural light around me. Now after all of these years, the act of "seeing” the light has become natural. I know light now like an old friend.

 
 
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ON THE HORIZON - She’s Going Hollywood Tonight

Her Audrey Hepburn doesn’t have the perfect puff on her head and holds a datoon between her teeth instead of a cigarette; her Cameron Diaz rests her hand on a charpoy instead of a plush bed; her Julia Roberts wears a salwar kameez with a dupatta instead of a flattering short dress and her Drew Barrymore wears a nath in her nose and a bindi on her forehead.

Kannagi Khanna in her series titled Hollywood, juxtaposes two contradictory worlds that share the same name and brings out their stark differences, ironically, by finding affinity between them. Over a phone conversation she candidly tells me the intriguing story and her experience of shooting ‘ Hollywood’ in India.

 
 
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TIPS & TECHS - Panorama

A panoramic image, also known as a panorama, is a strip image with a wide field of coverage. A panorama has a wider aspect ratio than a normal image which is why it tends to stand out as compared to a regular image. In the early days of film, photographers would join each frame individually and scan them to create a panorama. And there were some who could afford an expensive panoramic camera and would directly shoot panoramic images and later develop them in the darkroom.

But with the advent of the digital format, things have changed. One can now not

only create panoramas digitally, but also incorporate different techniques and methods for creating them. While shooting a panoramic photograph on a digital format, you need to keep in mind that there are two procedures that help complete a successful panorama – the shooting technique and the stitching technique.

 
 
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1 in a many

We all know that an image can convey many meanings, but how do you think an image would look if one was to add two or more images in a single frame? Sounds exciting, right? This month we look at capturing multiple images of one or many subjects and place them in a single frame to either tell a story or show more than one angle of view of an object, place or person.

This process involves more shooting than simply sitting in front of a computer stitching images together. It is an interesting photo experiment of having not just one picture in the frame, but instead adding a variety of shots in the same frame. You can be creative and try out shots with a single subject photographed from different angles or capture a series of shots conveying sort of a short story.

 
 
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Composition

Composition in photography deals with the arrangement or the placement of various ingredients in a picture, bringing order to all the elements that make your photograph. While there are no fixed rules, certain established composition guidelines certainly help enhance the impact of a scene. Emphasising and highlighting some of the patterns around us can lead to striking photographs. The elements you choose to include or for that matter, exclude from your photograph can make or break the photograph.

Lines, curves, patterns, symmetry, texture, colour, are some of the key elements in composing a photograph. Over the years, we’ve probably touched upon several factors pertaining to the composition of an aesthetically pleasing photograph. This month, we take you through what is perhaps the most important element of them all - lines.

 
 
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Studio Portrait Lighting Patterns

Portrait photography displays the expression, personality, and the mood of the subject and in most cases, the focus of the photograph is the subject’s face, accentuated by appropriate lighting. Lighting is the single most critical factor while shooting portraits, since the highlights and shadows created by the light, add depth to the image. The relationship between the subject and the light - its placement, intensity and the direction in which it falls on the subject - is crucial since it helps create depth in the photograph. This is also the reason why during a studio session, one of the first things any photographer works on positioning of the lighting equipment, followed by everything else. This month we give you a few basic lighting patterns which are commonly used in studio sessions and tell you about the characteristics of each.

 
 
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CAMERA REVIEW - Nikon D800

Nikon’s latest offering, the D800 pumps out 36.3 million pixels per frame, and this gives it an edge over most of the new releases this year. We had the privilege to lay our hands on a couple of full frame cameras earlier this year; the Nikon D4 and the Canon 5D Mark III, both of which delivered exceptional performance. This month it’s time to put the Nikon D800 to test and see how it fares.

One of the key topics of conversation triggered by the announcement of the D800 was the camera’s whopping 36.3 million pixels count, which is about three times that of its predecessor, the D700. If you thought that the megapixel war was over, you might want to think again. Coming only weeks after the announcement of the Nikon D4, it’s no surprise to find that the D800 shares some of the hardware found in its more expensive big brother.

 
 
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CAMERA REVIEW - Olympus OM-D E-M5

The latest camera from Olympus’ stable, the OM-D E-M5 takes after the older series of Olympus cameras by the same name. Although those were originally SLR cameras, the new OM-D E-M5 is the latest addition to Olympus’ lineup of mirrorless micro-four thirds cameras. Attempting to evoke a sense of nostalgia amongst the consumers with its rangefinder-like retro aesthetic, the camera’s design is both functional and reflective of Olympus’ heritage. The camera however isn’t a continuation of the formerly successful OM line of cameras, and it isn’t built around the OMlens mount yet the concept focuses around the micro-four thirds format.

 
 
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