SAP Media Worldwide Ltd. publishes monthly magazine for Indian Photography Industry
 
 
 
Dear Sir, After 4 years of extensive point and shoot photography, primarily landscape and street, finally I’m moving to a DSLR. I've used a borrowed Canon 600D quite extensively in the past, so I have some experience in DSLR photography. I’ll be getting the 18–55 mm kit & 35 mm f1.8 prime lenses along with the body. My dilemma is whether to go for the classic, slightly older Nikon D5200 with the 39 point AF system and the older EXPEED 3 processor, or the Nikon D3300 with the 11 point AF system and the latest EXPEED 4 which also results in a better battery life and a quality ISO performance. I've chosen these two models specifically because both of them are selling at same price currently, right within my budget. Will the omitted low pass filter in D3300 really result in improved quality images than the D5200? Will Nikon discontinue D5200's support soon since it's about 3 years old now? Will the new AF-P kit lenses being supplied with the D3300 really result in a better image quality than the AF-S lenses that would come with the D5200? Specifications related to video shooting isn't a concern for me since I would only be taking photos extensively on it. I'll be using it on my travels (specifically portraits, street, architecture) and also some occasional social outings with friends and family. I simply can't compromise with the image quality and flexibility to do new things with the camera! I need some urgent suggestions! Thanks in advance!
- Soudipan Maity, New Delhi

Dear Soudipan,

 

Well there are a number of questions that you have asked and I will try and address them one-by-one. But as I mentioned before this question as well, my suggestion is to always go with a much newer product as compared to the older one since it features upgraded technology and yes the support over a period of time is reduced for the older products, but not completely eliminated. Assuming that you will use your DSLR for at least couple of years here are my suggestions.

 

If you plan to use this for the purpose that you've highlighted in the questions then my suggestion would be stretch your budget a little and go for the newly launched D5300, which is probably a stretch of another 5k from your current budget, but will deliver a far superior performance as compared to either of the other models.

 

But should you choose not to go for the D5300 then I would suggest going for the D3300 since it is the newer model compared to the D5200 and also the absence of the low pass filter and a better processor will surely deliver a better performance as compared to the earlier one. But it is important to understand that both these cameras are from a different segment so a direct comparison between the two isn’t possible.

 

I don't think that Nikon will discontinue the support for the D5200 for another few years since most photographers don't upgrade to a new model regularly. Since you aren’t looking to shoot much on video that’s out of the question, but either ways D3300 would deliver better quality on that front as well since it also has the new AF-S kit.  

Regs,
Editor, Asian Photography (India Edition)   

Dear Sir, I want to capture pics of my growing child, I have shortlisted two Nikon D7000 and D5300, which of these will deliver better images, which is sharper and crisper image with prime lens (35 mm& 50 mm)?
- PAWAN RANA, ANKLESHWAR

Dear Pawan,

 

There isn’t much of a difference between the two cameras in terms of the size of the sensor, processor or the ISO. But there is a major difference between the two in terms of the megapixels which might affect the image quality. For instance, the D5300 has a 24.2 megapixel APSC sensor as compared to the 16-megapixel sensor of the D7000, which ideally would deliver much crisper and sharper images in regular shooting conditions.

 

I am suggesting these assuming that the lenses that you will use with both of them will be the same and also all the other factors would also be the same. Either ways I am a fan of newer technology as compared to the older one all the time so my preference would be the Nikon D5300.

Regs,
Editor, Asian Photography (India Edition) 

Hi, I want to pursue my career in photography for which i want to know how should i start. Currently I work on my own but I want to learn from professionals. Can you please help me, how can I get in touch with professionals and are there any course or master degree in photography i can go for? Dear Prasoon, Well you seem to be on the right path in order to start. There are two ways that you can move ahead. If you already think that you are well-versed with photography, then you might want to start approaching photographers to intern or assist with them so that you can get hands-on experience. If you think you still need to learn further or are not confident of your knowledge about photography, then you might want to take up a course in photography. There are number of good photography schools which offer courses of different types depending on what you like. My suggestion would be pursue the school first and then go and assist a photographer. Regs, Editor, Asian Photography (India Edition)
- Prasoon Gokhr, Bhopal

Dear Prasoon,

 

Well you seem to be on the right path in order to start. There are two ways that you can move ahead. If you already think that you are well-versed with photography, then you might want to start approaching photographers to intern or assist with them so that you can get hands-on experience.

 

If you think you still need to learn further or are not confident of your knowledge about photography, then you might want to take up a course in photography. There are number of good photography schools which offer courses of different types depending on what you like. My suggestion would be pursue the school first and then go and assist a photographer.  


Regs,

Editor, Asian Photography (India Edition)

Is editing allowed in case of a photograph to be submitted for compitition.......if allowed then upto which extent.....?
- ABHINANDAN SEN, Kolkata

First, carefully read the rules and guidelines of any competition you enter – these will clearly state how much, if any, post-processing and image editing is acceptable.
Generally, basic editing such as colour/contrast correction, exposure adjustment, cropping etc, is allowed. Some amount of distortion control, or lens aberration control may also be allowed.
A rule of thumb, the results after editing, should look like a ‘photograph’ and not ‘Computer Generated Images’.
More extensive editing, especially if it amounts to image manipulation through cloning, over-painting etc, will be frowned upon, since the primary aim is a test, or exhibition, of photographic skills.

Sir, I want to carrier in wildlife and landscape photography. I am confused how i can start my carrier. Should i join under well known photographer? By this my photos will press in this magazine? Please guide me sir. Thank you
- Ankur B. patel, Valsad

Photography is a practical art – and no matter how well versed you are in the theory, ultimately you will need to get hands-on experience. Apprenticing with a professional, is a good way to gain this experience, learn the tricks of the trade, and even understand about planning a shoot – such as the choices of equipment, location hunting, making travel arrangements… it is a long list!
This will also give you exposure to aspects of the business end – such as prospecting for clients, quality control and archiving your images.
Surely, with all round skill, hard work, dedication and a professional approach, your photographs will get published on a regular basis, rather than just once in a way.

Hi, I am a serious hobbyist photographer. I have been experimenting with my camera (Canon SX130 IS). i want to do Insect (macro) photography. I cant get the colors and details in clear. Is ther anyway i can get the eye catchy colors?
- Sajeesh R, Coimbatore

Getting good colour and saturation in digital photography begins with careful exposure control. Pay attention to the highlights, to avoid burnt out details. Evaluate shadows areas, if they are too dark and devoid of detail, try using a fill-flash, or a fill-light. This will ensure you have full tonal range. On your camera, make sure the white balance is appropriately set, focus carefully, and use a tripod to get the sharpest possible image.
You could also try basic image editing to increase saturation, and tweak the colours, but there are limits to how much one can process a JPEG file without degrading the image details.
Ideally, one should be using a DSLR with a proper macro lens, shoot the image in RAW format and process the RAW files for colour and contrast, per your creative tastes.

 
 
 
 

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